Click on the thumbnails below to find out more.

view detailsview detailsview details
Rei Niho Paraoa (chevron type sperm whale tooth pendant)  1300-1500Toki (adze blade)  1250-1500Child’s wrap  circa 1875
view detailsview detailsview details
Hangi Band  20th CenturyHinaki (eel/fish trap)Hoe (paddle)  1700-1770
view detailsview detailsview details
Kaka poria (bird leg ring)  19th centuryKahu kura (käkä feather cloak)  1900-1940Koauau (Flute)
view detailsview detailsview details
Korere (feeding funnel)  19th centuryKäkahu with feathers and wool (cloak)  1860-1900Kahu kiwi (kiwi feather cloak)  1800-1900
view detailsview detailsview details
Kahu kurï (dog skin cloak)Kahu koati (cloak with goat hair)  1870-1880Kete (bag)
view detailsview detailsview details
Kete Pukirikiri (bag)Kete (bag)Upoko tangata (form of kite)
view detailsview detailsview details
Punga (anchor stone), "Maungaroa "Mutu Kaka (bird snare)  1850-1900Nguru (nose flute)  1700-1850
view detailsview detailsview details
Kete (bag)Kahu puakarimu (rain cape)  1850-1900Pütatara (shell trumpet)  1800-1900
view detailsview detailsview details
Putorino (bugle flute)Decorative Pa Kahawai (trolling lure)Patiti (hatchet) with harpoon head  1830-1850
view detailsview detailsview details
Patu paraoa (whale bone hand weapon)  early 19th centuryPiupiu (skirt)  Te Huringa IPiupiu (skirt)  Te Huringa II
view detailsview detailsview details
Poi awe (percussive device)  19th centuryPou whakairo (carved figure)  1882Pukaea (war trumpet)  1700-1850
view detailsview detailsview details
Räkau whakapapa (mnemonic genealogical staff)Rei Niho Paraoa (sperm whale tooth pendant)  1500-1800Maori woman  circa 1865
view detailsview detailsview details
Tä Moko panel  1896-1899Taoka Tawhito  19th centuryTauira (Maori woven textile sampler)  circa 1904
view detailsview detailsview details
Te Täkinga pätaka  1845-1855Tekoteko (gable figure)  19th centuryTekoteko (gable figure) an Ariki Tapairu / sometimes referred to as Madonna and child,  1850-1900
view detailsview detailsview details
Wakahuia (treasure box)  1700-1777Timo in useMakotukutuku  09.2003
view detailsview detailsview details
Workshop on Traditional Maori Musical Instruments  15.05.1998Maori Musical Instruments  1923Hei tiki (pendant in human form)
view detailsview detailsview details
Rua Kai or Food Storage Pit  1923Rangi Skipper Moko demonstration  05.1999Traditional Maori Cooking  1923
view details
Whai or Maori String Games  1912 - 1926


Pukaea (war trumpet)


Pukaea (war trumpet)  1700-1850
wood,
This artwork is featured in Te Papa's Collections Online


Description

This is a pukaea, or Maori war trumpet, made from wood that has been split, hollowed and bound together with sections of lashings that vary in colour from black to reddish-brown. The body is slightly conical and the non-blowing end (whara) flares out to a bell shape on which is a carved border of triangles. The pukaea measures 122 cm (length) x 2.19 cm (width) x 2.22 cm (depth), and its origins are no longer known.

Educational value

  • This asset is an instrument that can produce an extremely loud sound when blown through the kongutu (mouthpiece) - it was used before battle, to welcome people, to announce events or occasions of importance, and by watchmen who sounded single-note blasts in times of emergency; its sound can be heard kilometres away.
  • It is an example of an instrument that varied considerably in length - some were known to be more than 2 m long.
  • It provides an example of the impact of European arrival on Maori cultural knowledge - the dislocation caused by European settlement meant that many of the traditions and performance skills associated with taonga puoro (Maori musical instruments) such as this were lost.
  • It provides an example of the impact of European arrival on taonga (Maori cultural treasures) such as pukaea - many of these treasures, whose stories were a key element in the transmission of cultural values between generations, were acquired by collectors, ethnographers and naturalists during the 19th and early 20th centuries, and their names and stories were lost.

> Back to Customary Taonga Maori


All artworks are reproduced courtesy of the Estate of Rita Angus.